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Sorry while I geek out here for a bit. NASA released a new picture Tuesday from the new camera installed in the Hubble Space Telescope last fall. It is a picture of a microscopic portion of the sky (1 / 50 of an degree square). This portion of the sky would easily fit behind the head of a pin held at an arms length.

 HST WFV 3 HD image

This picture completely blows you away if you just give it a little thought. Virtually every speck in this picture is a galaxy. Click on it to get a high resolution image and see. An average size galaxy has 150-200 billion stars.  How many is that? Consider the following:

There are approx. 5 000 Cheerios in a 575g box. How do I know this? Thank OCD and the Internet.  Sobey’s in Beamsville has 38 boxes on the shelf tonight but imagine if every shelf on every aisle in the store had only Cheerios. Sobey’s in Beamsville would have just less than 50 000 boxes of Cheerios. (24 aisles x 5 shelves x approx. 12 boxes deep x approx. 32 boxes wide) So one Sobey’s has 250 million Cheerios. (5 000 Cheerios per box x 50 000 boxes = 250 000 000 Cheerios)

400 Sobey’s Grocery stores filled wall to wall with nothing but Cheerios would be 200 billion Cheerios. That’s one Cheerio for each star. That’s one galaxy; one speck in a picture that is the size of a speck in the sky. And did you ever think that we can only see half the sky at a time? There is another whole sky in Australia! Which leads to the greatest understatement in the whole Bible:

“God made two great lights—the greater light to govern the day and the lesser light to govern the night. He also made the stars.” Gen. 1: 16

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